Author:
Category:

The story of Miles Davis – one of the most influential jazz trumpeters and bandleaders of the 20th century

"I don't want you to like me because of Kind of Blue," he insisted. “I like what we are doing now!”

Biography of Miles Davis: From Early Years at Alton to Resounding Success in the 1960s

Miles Davis - American musician, great jazz trumpeter, who as a bandleader and composer has had a great influence on the art since the end 1940s years... Davis, was perhaps the most influential jazz musician in the period after World War II! And he continued to be at the forefront of the changes in this genre. over 40 years… This man created music that came from an uncanny talent for hearing the future and a stubborn desire to play it… Starting his career in modern jazz, he began to intuitively understand new worlds of sound! Miles always went forward, trusting and following instinct to the very end. So, he became the standard-bearer of successive generations of musicians, more than half a dozen times determining the course of modern improvised music... How was his childhood? What stages are considered to be the most significant in his career? First things first…

Getting started

Miles Davis
Miles Davis

Born into a middle class family in 1926, Davis started playing the trumpet at 13. But let's start with the fact that the future jazz star grew up in East St. Louis, Illinoiswhere his father was a successful dental surgeon. In later years Miles often talked about his upbringing, sometimes to rebuke critics who believed that poverty and suffering were common to all great jazz players ...

As a teenager, Davis played with jazz bands in the area. St. Louisbefore you move to New York in 1944 in order to enter the Institute of Musical Art. However, upon entering an educational institution, Davis often skipped classes: instead, he participated in jam sessions with such masters as Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker. Miles and Parker often recorded together in the second half 1940s.

It didn't take long for Davis to immerse himself in the New York scene... Together with Charlie Parker, he began working on 52nd Street. Soon he began to play with Coleman Hawkins, as well as with large groups Billy Eckstein and Benny Carter. early game Davis sometimes hesitant and not always completely in tune, but his unique intimate tone and rich musical imagination outweighed his technical shortcomings ... However, gradually, experimenting with harmonies and rhythms, Miles developed his own style! His melodic style was direct and uncomplicated... The thoughtfulness, tempo and lyricism of his improvisations are striking. In the end 1940s years, many contemporaries of music began to meet regularly and jam in the small apartment of a pianist-arranger Gila Evans. Among them were saxophonists Gerry Mulligan and Lee Konitzand also a pianist John Lewis. From this group of musicians, Davis formed the Nonet to record his first major musical performance. "Birth of the Cool"!

In addition to the standard rhythm section of piano, bass and drums, the horn section featured horn and tuba, as well as trombone, alto and baritone saxophones. This combination of instruments gave the band a unique harmonious sound…

Career: early years

The group did not last long, but during its short history it recorded about a dozen tracks, which were originally released as singles! These recordings changed the course of modern jazz and paved the way for West Coast styles. 1950s years. Later they were all collected in an album. Birth of the Cool (1957). At the start of the decade Miles Davis struggled with an addiction that affected his game. But still he managed to record albums that are among his best! Some of them have been recorded with such famous jazz musicians as Sonny Rollins, Milt Jackson and Thelonious Monk. In 1954, having overcome his addiction, Davis entered a two-year period during which he was considered the most innovative jazz musician ...

His albums are Round About Midnight (1956), Workin (1956), Steamin (1956), Relaxin' (1956) and Milestones (1958) - influenced the work of many other artists. The final stage of this period was the album Kind of Blue (1959)perhaps the most famous in the history of jazz...

Success

Miles Davis...
Miles Davis...

Start 1960's was a transitional, less innovative year for Davis, although his music and his playing remained top notch. He began to form another small group that would soon become a classic: bassist Ron Carter, pianist Herbie Hancock and drummer Tony Williams! Tenor saxophonist Wayne Shorter joined the squad in 1964… The quintet had a light, free sound and a repertoire from blues to avant-garde and free jazz. Compared to the innovations of other modern jazz bands 1960's years, the Davis Quintet experimented with polyrhythm and polytonality more subtly, but no less boldly!

Live at the Plugged Nickel (1965), ESP (1965), Live at the Plugged Nickel (1965), ESP (1965), Miles Smiles (1966) and Nefertiti (1967) were among the quintet's timeless and influential recordings! Gradually, Davis began to experiment with electronic instruments, which becomes evident in the albums. Miles in the Sky and Filles de Kilimanjaro (both 1968). And his record In a Silent Way (1969) considered the seminal album of the jazz fusion movement... Purists considered it Davis' last true jazz album.

Davis won new fans and alienated old ones with the release Bitches Brew (1969), an album in which he fully embraced the rhythms, electronic instruments and studio effects of rock music! A cacophonous kaleidoscope of layered sounds, rhythms and textures, the influence of this album was heard in the work of such fusion bands 1970's years as Weather Report and Return to Forever by Chick Corea. Davis continued with this style for several years. One of the clearest examples is the album Live Evil (1970) and soundtrack to a documentary about the American boxer Jack Johnson (A Tribute to Jack Johnson).

New decade and new achievements

Miles Davis
Miles Davis

Davis was injured in a car accident in 1972 year, after which it was not heard until the beginning of the new decade ... After graduation in 1981 album year The Man with the Horn critics noted that Davis's erratic performance showed the effects of his five-year layoff... But over the next few years, Miles steadily rebuilt his strength.

He has dabbled in various musical styles throughout 1980s, concentrating mainly on dance jazz-rock music. There were also notable experiments in other styles, such as a return to their blues roots. (Star People 1982). During this period, Davis received several Grammy Awards for albums such as We Want Miles (1982), Tutu (1986) and Aura (1989).

One of the most memorable events of the last years of Davis's life happened during a jazz festival in Montreux in 1991when he joined an orchestra conducted by Quincy Jones! Then Miles performed some of the classic arrangements Gila Evans late 1950s… Davis died less than three months later. His latest album Doo Bop (1992), was released posthumously.

Although critics have dismissed much of the music released by Davis since Bitches Brew, his live performances helped keep jazz popular with mainstream audiences. In later years, he ignored critics and defied convention by roaming the stage, often playing with his back to the audience. In his laudatory and revealing autobiography Miles He wrote candidly about his hedonistic past and the racism he saw in the music industry. As well as Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington and Charlie ParkerDavis is considered one of the four most important and influential musicians in jazz history, as well as the most eclectic performer of music...

End of story...

Ironically, in 1991 year, just a few weeks after performing in Paris with a review concert, which included old friends and employees from 1940s years, the musician died ... Miles Davis died September 28, 1991 in Santa Monica, California for a brain aneurysm. Throughout his career, he has always resisted criticism and looking back, avoiding nostalgia... Like his music, Miles always spoke concisely. And for him, as an artist, it was important to stay fresh for the audience:

"I don't want you to like me because of Kind of Blue," he insisted. “I like what we are doing now!”

Kirkorov was Michael Jackson's "friend": fiction or truth

Friendship between Michael Jackson and Philip Kirkorov Michael Jackson is an American pop king who has made a tremendous contribution to music history. However, many myths have always centered around him,...

"Accident, betrayal, and more": the indestructible spirit of Don Powell, Slade drummer

Slade legend Don Powell and his story: facts and interviews He's past his eighth decade, but he's still an indestructible legend. Don Powell, the legendary Slade drummer,...

Top 5 iconic rock albums that turned into a nightmare

Legendary rock albums that turned into a nightmare to record At first glance, being a rock star seems like the nicest job in the world! Your job is just to compose...
Related Articles

The Perfect Songs That Started Hard Rock

The Tracks That Started Hard Rock - Top of the Best After the legendary "Summer of Love," rock 'n' roll grew more and more confidently and confidently spiked. It seemed that the "soft" era of The Beatles and...

Rock legends' Top 5 Chic "Late" Releases

Rock Stars' Best Late-Life Releases Not every rock star can keep the fire burning until the end of time. It's only natural that performers get older, and you wouldn't expect them to be...

Dan McCafferty's Best Songs

Dan McCafferty and his best songs Dan McCafferty is a legend in the Scottish rock band Nazareth and one of classic rock's most recognizable voices. Born in...

The Best Early Pink Floyd Songs by Fuzz Music Magazine

The best songs of early Pink Floyd: early hits, clips and facts Pink Floyd is one of the most legendary bands in the history of rock. To the account of the group millions of sold...

The coolest punk rockers in history according to Fuzz Music Magazine - Part Two

The best and most popular punk rockers in history - part two Today we continue to remember the brightest and most charismatic rebels in the history of punk rock! In their own ...